Relationship between teacher and students in the classroom

relationship between teacher and students in the classroom

Developing positive relationships between teachers and students has a positive, significant, and long-lasting impact on the students' lives, both. Relationship between student, teacher, classroom characteristics and students' school wellbeing. Karen Van Petegem. Promotor: Prof. Dr. Antonia Aelterman. When teachers form positive bonds with students, classrooms become supportive Motivation may play a key role in the relationship between teacher-student.

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Journal of youth and adolescence, 41 2 Further support for the developmental significance of the quality of the teacher—student relationship.

Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

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Often it is the students who were the most challenging and with whom you had to spend the most time who continue to visit you over the years. This is due to the positive relationships you developed with them. The goal in correcting students should be to have them reflect on what they did, be sorry that they disappointed you, and make a better choice in the future. I'm going to be sure I don't get caught next time. If you allow students to keep their dignity, you increase the chance that they will reflect on their behavior and choose their behaviors more wisely in the future.

The correction process will be counterproductive if students are corrected in a manner that communicates bitterness, sarcasm, low expectations, or disgust.

The importance of positive teacher-student relationships in classrooms - The Educator Blog

The goal is to provide a quick, fair, and meaningful consequence while at the same time communicating that you care for and respect the student. Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: Discuss the incident with Johnny.

relationship between teacher and students in the classroom

Begin with fact finding to be sure that you are appropriately correcting the student. The worst way to affect teacher-student relationships is to unfairly discipline a student.

Identify and accept the student's feelings. Tell Johnny that you understand why it upset him to hear somebody call his mother a name and that you, too, would be upset if someone maligned your mother.

It's important to understand that this step communicates that you respect and understand his feelings but that you are not accepting his actions. Go over with Johnny the different actions he could have taken, such as ignoring the remark or reporting it to a teacher. Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation. Remind Johnny of the building policy of not fighting and that the rule is if anyone hits another student, he or she will be sent to the office and possibly be suspended from school.

Let the student know that all students are treated the same. Make sure that Johnny understands that all students must adhere to the policy and that any student who disregards the rule will suffer the consequences.

Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence. Communicate with the office about what happened and send Johnny to the office. Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action.

The importance of positive teacher-student relationships in classrooms

Tell Johnny that you are disappointed that his actions have led to this situation. Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future. Remind Johnny that, although you do not approve of his actions and do not like to send him or any student to the office, you like him and know that he will make a better choice next time.

Also tell him that you are there to support him and work through these issues with him in the future. In addition to your following these steps when correcting a student, it is important to keep some key philosophical precepts in mind.

First of all, remember to correct the student in a private location. Although it is not always possible to remove a student from the classroom, do your best to prevent visual access by other students as you discipline.

relationship between teacher and students in the classroom

Public correction can foster feelings of anger, embarrassment, and bitterness; it can also become a sideshow for the other students. Finally, remember to stay calm and avoid frustration. The worst thing you can do is to invoke a consequence when you are angry or upset, as this can lead to regrettable actions on your part. Key Philosophical Precepts When Correcting Students Correct in a private location Treat students as you want your own children treated Stay calm Avoid frustration It is also important to follow certain steps after disciplining a student.

These steps are shown in Figure 1. Steps to Follow After Disciplining a Student Touch base with the student Acknowledge postdisciplinary successes Don't give up too quickly Let's go back to the example of Johnny, in which he earned an office referral because he hit Sam. Here are some actions you could take: Touch base with the student.

Follow up with Johnny after the consequence, checking to see how he's doing and simply making contact with him. The next time Johnny has difficulty with a student and handles the situation more appropriately, such as by verbalizing his displeasure rather than using his fists, be sure to acknowledge his behavior and praise him for making the right choice.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

Don't give up too quickly. Finally, don't forget that some students respond negatively to positive attention. In such cases, it may appear that the student doesn't want the positive attention.

What may actually be happening is a gradual change in the student's self-concept.

relationship between teacher and students in the classroom

When students are used to getting into trouble and having negative attention, it takes a while to break this cycle.