Compare iago and roderigo relationship

Shakespeare's Othello - Othello's Relationship with Iago and Iago's Motive

compare iago and roderigo relationship

What is the difference between a relationship and a serious relationship? I'd start How does Desdemona's handkerchief come into play within that relationship. Relationships play an integral role throughout Shakespeare's 'Othello' as Iago leads Roderigo 'by the nose' throughout the scene and manipulates him to. Desdemona and Othello, by Antonio Muñoz Degrain. him as he puts his relationships on hold to achieve his position back; sidelining Bianca.

However, the personal relationship between Othello and Iago is much more complex. Othello trusts Iago totally as Iago has a reputation in Venice for being very honest: However, Iago despises Othello and makes it his personal mission to destroy him: Several strokes of good fortune the handkerchief etc help Iago keep Othello on side until the murder of Desdamona but ultimately it is his genius for manipulation and trickery that ensures his success.

Desdemona and Othello - True Love? In marrying a 'Moor', Desdemona flies in the face of convention and faces familial and societal criticism for her bold choice.

What is the relationship between Iago and Roderigo

Her father is shocked and dismayed: She fell in love with his stories of valour; "These things to hear would Desdemona seriously incline". This also shows that she is not a passive, submissive character in that she decided she wanted him and she pursued him.

On the subject of her relationship with Othello, Desdemona says: That I did love the Moor to live with him, My downright violence and storm of fortunes May trumpet to the world: I saw Othello's visage in his mind, And to his honour and his valiant parts Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate. While Othello appears confident of her love for him in Act 1 deep down he is insecure in the relationship.

He can't quite believe how happy he is that she loves him: If it were now to die, 'Twere now to be most happy; for I fear, My soul hath her content so absolute That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate. When Iago starts making vague suggestions of Cassio's untrustworthy nature Othello's confidence is knocked sideways very rapidly: This would point to him being more worried about his hurt pride than about the fact that she might not love him.

Desdemona, unlike her husband, is not insecure, even when called a 'whore' she remains loyal to him and resolves to love him despite his misunderstanding of her; she is resolute and tenacious in the face of adversity. Her love for Othello is unwaning: My love doth so approve him That even his stubbornness, his checks, his frowns - Prithee unpin me - have grace and favour in them. The first scene of Othello presents a conversation between Roderigo, the disappointed suitor of Desdemona, and Iago, concerning incidents of which Othello is the chief agent.

Othello and Desdemona have eloped, it seems, leaving Roderigo disappointed and distressed. He complains that Iago had not forewarned him in order that their marriage might have been prevented. But Iago, though in close touch with Othello, protests he did not "dream of such a matter," implying that it was as much a surprise to him as to any one. For some time lago had what he considered good reason for hating the Moor, though this latest episode enables him for the first time to see through the whole affair.

othello and iago relationship essay

Othello's attachment to Desdemona now explains why he was passed by and the new appointment of lieutenant to Othello was conferred upon Cassio. After his usual manner Shakespeare has made the opening conflict, that between Othello and lago, the chief conflict of the play.

But this is a conflict between two men who had up to this time been the nearest and warmest friends, one a great general and the other his most trusted officer. There is plenty of evidence throughout the play that up to this time there had been the fullest confidence between the two, and both alike were looked upon as men of excellent ability and sterling character.

Othello was known as a noble Moor and had attained the highest military position, and therefore must have had the fullest confidence of the state and the senate.

Relationships in Othello

Every one regarded lago also as an upright and noble-minded man, and he had earned for himself the epithet of "honest. We must then account for this change, as upon this change all the development of the play depends. This is the play. Shakespeare has apparently been at pains to show us what lago's attitude toward the Moor was, as well as what it is, and the explanation of the change can be found only in the play itself. We must explain it either from the incidents of the play or from the words of the play, or from both.

The incidents that take place at the opening of the play, at the same time as the change in the attitude of lago, are two, the courtship and marriage of Othello and Desdemona, and the promotion of Cassio to the position of lieutenant under Othello.

The words of Iago at the opening of the play show that he regards the latter as an offence to himself, and therefore makes it the ground of his hostility to Othello. He complains that Cassio has "had the election," and that, "He in good time must his [Othello's] Lieutenant be, And I bless the mark his Moorship's Ancient.

How is the relationship between Othello and Iago presented in Act 1 scene 1 and 2?

At a later time he comes to see some connection between the two incidents, and believes that Cassio got the appointment because of an old friendship with Desdemona, and probably because he carried messages between Othello and Desdemona during their courtship.

When Othello had occasion to appoint a lieutenant, "Three great ones of the city in personal suit" appealed to him on behalf of lago, only to find that he had already chosen Cassio.

It appeared to be a matter of personal preference only, for he could give no reason for the choice of Cassio. This capricious choice lago at once took as a very great slight upon him, and rightly so.

As one of "the usual lunacies," so-called, in the interpretation of the play, however, Professor Bradley says, "It has been held, for example, that Othello treated lago abominably in preferring Cassio to him.

This is the basis of the complaint of lago, and arouses at once his suspicion and bitter resentment, and soon turns him into an abiding but very stealthy enemy. If Othello can be capable of such gross violation of all military rules and practices, lago sees that he can no longer trust Othello, and that all confidence between them has virtually ceased to exist, and no longer can he hope for the intimate relationships of former days to continue.

This rewarding of Cassio with a military position because of personal service to himself and Desdemona was a most dangerous thing for a general to do, and opened up all kinds of possibilities of trouble, not only with lago, but with the discipline of all his forces. Only the fortune that favors fools could save him from disaster. But it was fatal when one of the disposition of lago was involved, for it turned him at once into an enemy, not only to himself, but to all the others connected with the insult, to Desdemona and Cassio, linking all three in his plan of revenge.

Here, then, is an outstanding fact that too few critics have even observed, and none have adequately explained.

compare iago and roderigo relationship

At this point in the lives of Othello and lago a great change comes over their relations. It cannot be too much insisted upon that up to this time they had, been the warmest and closest friends, and that lago had been in fact the confidential officer of Othello.

compare iago and roderigo relationship

Now all at once, for some reason that has not been understood, lago has been turned into the bitter enemy of his old friend, Othello, and as if to mark the importance of this for the interpretation of the play, the dramatist has chosen this point in their relations for the opening scene.

But in spite of all that has been observed about the importance of Shakespeare's opening scenes for the exposition of his dramatic art, little attention has been paid to this fact in respect to Othello.

The task of the critic at present, then, is to discover the cause of this great change in the relationships of these two men, and from this to trace the further development of the play. Ever since Coleridge it has been the common thing, though by no means universal, to attribute the whole trouble to the sudden and unmotived malignity of lago, or to forget the fact that it has been sudden and unlike anything heard of before on the part of lago, and to assume only the malignity.

Later critics, however, have not been able to overlook the emergence of the malignity at this time, and have attempted to explain it from their own imaginations rather than from the words of the play. Professor Bradley may be taken as voicing the best that can be said by those who would lay all the blame of the tragedy upon lago, but who feel they must account in some manner for this sudden malignity.